Tuesday, May 27, 2014

VOD Revolution is Here

Families used to gather around the TV at 8pm to watch their favorite prime time shows. It was a mark of honor for a program to be placed in that prime time slot. They had the largest audience, and with that came the most valuable advertising space. VOD (video on demand) in all its various forms is changing that.


VOD


Some popular shows are now only available through VOD services. For example, after an extremely popular run on FOX, Arrested Development was brought back exclusively on #Netflix, 7 years after its initial cancelation. Forbes.com columnist Dorothy Pomerantz thinks that “Bringing Back ‘Arrested Development’ is Netflix’s Smartest Move Yet”.


There have also been wildly successful series that premiered on the #VOD medium. The American series House of Cards premiered its entire first season on Neflix in 2013 to widely positive reviews.


VOD services like Neflix, Hulu, iTunes & even YouTube are even affecting DVD & Blu-Ray sales, especially when it comes to TV series boxed sets.


“What amazes us is that TV content owners are making TV streaming rights available to Netflix . . . It will be interesting to see if Hollywood executives can resist Netflix’s short-term cash, in order to protect their DVD ‘cash cow’ or whether they at least start adding some ‘000’s’ to the annual rates they charge Netflix for content.” – BTIG Research analyst Richard Greenfield


Which ever VOD service takes the lead in this movement, its clear that the user is really becoming their own personal content programmer, and watching their favorite shows when its most convenient for them.


Albert Cheng, vice president of Disney/ABC Digital Media, doesn’t think prime time television viewing is going anywhere anytime soon.


“They give the viewer another opportunity to see a show they’ve missed; they’re another opportunity to get that show further along (in its overall visibility). (Even with iPods and PCs), the bulk of consumer time will be spent in front of the tube. The largest platform you have will still be TV in five years, and it’ll play a large role in driving other platforms. In 10 or 15 years, I can’t see that far.”


Let us know what you think! Do you watch most of your favorite TV shows during it’s regular broadcast, or through VOD services, or something else? What do you foresee as the future of television?