Thursday, August 11, 2016

A Look At MIT’s Interactive Dynamic Video Technology

It seems like the future of augmented and virtual reality is forever growing – this time with MIT’s newest interactive dynamic video technology.

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)’s interactive dynamic video technology (or IDV) might just be the cherry on top to AR and VR.

In reverse AR/VR, IDV places real life subjects in virtual worlds and digital interfaces.

By simulating the real world, IDV puts users into another world with easy interactions. Much like Snapchat and Pokemon GO, users are able to interact with ‘non-real’ elements through cameras and motion-tracking algorithms. Business Insider explains,

“The camera records a video of the vibrating object, and then algorithms translate this clip into a dynamic image (or simulation) that users can interact with on their screens. The new simulation looks identical to the original video, except that you can now push and pull the virtualized object represented in the image by using a mouse or other input device.”

One interesting thing that BI (and many other publications) point out is the expenses involved with augmented or virtual reality. Unlike VR headgear (which can cost a pretty penny), IDV can be created by virtually any videographer with a clip of real-world footage and a bit of basic CGI, and editing, masking, matting and shading tools.

IDV also allows its users to interact with the physical world itself. Unlike other AR operating systems or games where users cannot alter real-world objects on their screen, IV gives users the options to make adjustments to both their virtual and non-virtual reality.

IDV also blurs the lines between live-action and AR. In it, the elements interact with and are affected by each other. For example, in Pokemon GO, characters are superimposed on top of reality but do not affect it. If a Psyduck is rustling through leaves to avoid being caught by your Pokeball, its presence has no actual effect on the very real leaves around it. In IDV, however, users can play with and adjust their reality through their screen. Check out this awesome video:

 

Here at Key West Video, we’re fans of the latest trends technologies in video, AR, and VR, and pride ourselves on being loyal Pokemon Go fans. For more information on our services, visit our website today!

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